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On First-Time Skiing
Always Say “Yes”
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There’s a moment when you think to yourself, “what am I doing?!” Here’s the story of how I got to that point.
“Always say yes,” a wise older friend of mine used to say. So when I was invited to go on a weekend ski vacation with a bunch of guys from a local social group, I said “yes.” And then I realized that I didn’t know how to ski. Crap.
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Lookin’ good!
Now, this could be a story of regret: I could tell you that I turned tail and Brave Sir Robin-style fled away.  I would have felt a tinge of sadness and retained a desire to know how to ski.  And I probably still wouldn’t know how to ski if I hadn’t said “yes.”  [By the way, if you want to check out a cool Op-Doc about courage in the face of scary sports, take a look at the ten meter tower challenge.  I’ve done a little bit of cliff diving in Vermont, but nothing close to ten meters!]

“I could tell you that I turned tail and Brave Sir Robin-style fled away.”

As I wrote in my About page, I came to skiing later in life, despite having grown up in snowy territory.  As a kid, I didn’t have family or friends who skied.  This was really the first chance I got to hit the slopes.  Was I going to go for it?  Yes, readers.  I took the advice of this blog to Take a Ski Vacation (.com)(gotta love the branding).  I figured I’d go, get to know these guys better, try to ski and, if I failed at it, spend the other hours simmering in the hot tub and chilling at après spots with sporty people telling stories of great runs.  What’s not to love about that?

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For this first outing, I was very fortunate. The group (oh, we had about twenty people who went) was organized by experienced skiers and planners who had done this on many, many previous occasions. That’s a boon to new skiers – these are people who knew the area resorts and the housing options, knew how to get there, knew who had the 4x4 vehicles, knew where the local grocery stores were for provisions, and the like. Having people know all of that information is a big help to the new skier because it allows you to focus on other things.

Like …oh, everything else!  Like: what gear should I get, what to wear, what was rentable, what I could bring on the slopes with me, what were the latest après trends, whether I needed a rider on my insurance policy for adventure sports… What was I doing?!  (See, I told you we’d get there).  No, I’m not A-Type much.  By the way, we’ll cover those basics in future posts — what to buy, what to pack, etc.

{Sninja might have a different take on this preference for going with a group of experienced skiers: she taught herself how to ski by venturing out solo! Major props for that!}

In my next posts I’ll fill you in on where we went and what I learned.

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